Detailed UK migration statistics – Key Points

The Detailed UK Migration Statistics are a release from the 2011 Census providing information on migration into and within the UK. These tables – available on the NOMIS website - provide detailed information about migrants moving into, and out of, a range of geographical areas from across the UK.

NRS have summarised some key points relating to Scotland which are provided below.
 

Key points

Migration in Scotland

  • Of Scotland’s total estimated population of 5.3 million at Census Day 2011 (27 March), just over 599,000 (11 per cent) lived at a different address compared with one year before the census.
  • This comprised 496,000 (9 per cent) who had moved address within Scotland, 41,000 (1 per cent) who had moved from elsewhere in the United Kingdom and 61,000 (1 per cent) who had moved from outside the United Kingdom. Of those who moved address within Scotland, just over three quarters had moved to a different address within the same council area.
  • In addition, 43,000 people had moved from Scotland the year before the census to live elsewhere in the United Kingdom.
Migration in Scotland sex and age
  • There is a distinct pattern of migration in relation to age. The 20 to 24 years old age group had the highest proportion (33 per cent) of people who had changed address compared since the year before the census. This proportion was also relatively high for people aged 25 to 34 (22 per cent) and aged 16 to 19 (20 per cent). It was lowest for people aged 50 and over, at 4 per cent.
  • The 20 to 24 years old age group also had the highest proportion of people who had moved to Scotland from elsewhere in the UK (2 per cent) or from outside the UK (5 per cent).
  • The proportion of people who had changed address since the year before the census was generally similar for males and females in most age groups, although for 16 to 24 years old age group it was higher for females (30 per cent) than for males (25 per cent). This is likely to be associated with higher participation rates in higher education by females compared with males.
Migration by council area
  • These migration flows can be compared across council areas in Scotland, but due to different population sizes it is appropriate to compare these flows as rates per 1,000 population.
  • Council areas with the highest rates of in-migration from other parts of Scotland included Stirling (38.8), Aberdeen City (36.0), Dundee City (32.6), Glasgow City (30.3), East Lothian (29.1), East Renfrewshire (29.0) and Midlothian (27.9).  These high rates of migration are in part likely to be associated with migration to university and developments in areas around City of Edinburgh and Glasgow City.
  • Council areas with relatively high in-migration from the rest of the United Kingdom include areas with armed forces bases - Argyll & Bute (16.8) and Moray (15.1); areas with universities - City of Edinburgh (16.7), Aberdeen City (11.2), and Stirling (10.6); and the two councils on the border with England - Dumfries & Galloway (11.1) and Scottish Borders (11.6).  Orkney Islands (10.9) and Highland (10.0) councils also had relatively high rates of in-migration from the rest of the United Kingdom.
  • Aberdeen City (34.0) and City of Edinburgh (34.0) council areas had the highest rate of in-migration from outside the United Kingdom.   The next highest rates were Glasgow City (21.3), Dundee City (20.2) and Stirling (18.9), likely to be associated with student migration.  Other council areas with high in-migration from outside the United Kingdom are Perth & Kinross (11.1), Shetland Islands (9.2), Aberdeenshire (9.1) and Fife (8.8).

Notes:

1. In the census statistics on migration, and in the analysis above, a person is classified as a migrant if the address they lived at on Census Day (27 March 2011) differed from the address they lived at one year before. A (randomly selected) half of the babies aged under 1 year of migrant parent(s) were also classified as migrants.